Welcome to the King’s Student Law Review

The King’s Student Law Review (KSLR) is a King’s College London publication. It is completely edited by King’s College students, and seeks to publish the very best of legal scholarship written by students at King’s and other leading law schools. The KSLR is listed in the international database HeinOnline.

 

Current Issue

VOLUME IV
ISSUE II – 2012-2013 (Download)

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An evaluation of reforms to auditor liability: a necessity or a step too far?

An evaluation of reforms to auditor liability: a necessity or a step too far?

Name: Aureilia Jayne Storey University: The University of Birmingham Abstract Auditors provide a key investigative function in the business world. The law in relation to auditors changed significantly with the introduction of the Companies Act2006 and it is now possible for audit firms to limit their liability towards clients through contractual agreements. Such an opportunity for limitation has proven to be controversial and this article will assess whether this step was really necessary by considering the current potential for liability of

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Are International Human Rights Selfish?

Are International Human Rights Selfish?

Name: Ervis Haziri University: Queen Mary, University of London Abstract   It is an unsettling truth that the yellow scrolls of history are replete with records of destruction and acrimony. Generation upon generation, from one century to the next humanity frequently erected walls of seclusion and discrimination based on race, nationality, belief etc. But walls fall and as they crumble a wind of change often swirls over the ruins. Yet, humanity alone brings about this change as an antidote to the perils and turmoil that befall nations

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The UK and its ‘good tax system’: an analysis based on the evolving criteria

The UK and its ‘good tax system’: an analysis based on the evolving criteria

Name: Ligali Ajibola Ayorinde University: Queen Mary, University of London   Abstract This article presents a discussion of whether the United Kingdom possesses a ‘good tax system’. There will be particular focus on the side of progressive taxation, given J.S. Mill’s contribution to this area. The bases of the analysis will be provided by Adam Smith’s criteria for a ‘good tax system’ and the principles stated in the Meade Committee Report of 1978.   Introduction Taxation, being “the appropriation of property by the sta

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The future for Maltese tax litigation after John Geranzi Limited v Commissioner of Inland Revenue

The future for Maltese tax litigation after John Geranzi Limited v Commissioner of Inland Revenue

Name: Nicola Jaccarini University: University of Malta     Introduction   The notion of fundamental human rights was first enunciated on an international scale in the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, followed by the 1950 adoption of the Convention for Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.[1] At first glance, the link between taxation and such rights is not as explicit and obvious as is the case in the realm of other branches of law.[2] However, a deeper examination would inevitably lead one t

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Absence of Precedent In Investment Arbitration: A Missed Opportunity to Clarify Standards of Protection?

Absence of Precedent In Investment Arbitration: A Missed Opportunity to Clarify Standards of Protection?

Name: Devrim Deniz Celik University: University College London   Abstract Entrepreneurs[1] who invest capital in a business face financial risks especially when they invest in a foreign country where there is no regulatory and economic stability, so they generally avoid investing in such countries. To attract foreign capital, states enter into Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs), under which a reasonable level of protection is promised to investors. In this context, a reasonable level of protection includes the state’s promise that i

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Development of Corporate Ownership and Control in China

Development of Corporate Ownership and Control in China

Name: Min Yan University: King's College London Abstracts: This paper focuses on the historical development of China’s corporate forms in different stages and their respective features as well as the main causes and effects. The author discusses the governmental impact upon the corporate evolution from the perspective of ownership and control and concludes on its negative influence in general. It is the aim of this article to demonstrate that governments should not interfere too much in the development of these corporate sectors and unnecess

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House of Lords Reform: Where now?

House of Lords Reform: Where now?

Name: Scott Wallace University: Girton College, University of Cambridge Introduction To borrow an opening from Lord Bingham[1], Lord Hailsham wrote of the House of Lords: “No one in his right mind could ever have invented the House of Lords with its archbishops and bishops, Lords of Appeal in Ordinary, hereditary peerages marshalled into hierarchical grades of dukes, marquesses, earls, viscounts and barons, its life peers nominated by the executive, its truncated powers, its absence of internal discipline and its liability to abolition.”

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Negotiation and Mediation: Promoting a Culture of Injustice?

Negotiation and Mediation: Promoting a Culture of Injustice?

Name: Charitha Shashiraj University: NALSAR University of Law, India I.               Introduction   There is something remarkably attractive about the idea of being the master of your own fate. Something even more attractive is influencing that of others. Small wonder then that processes like negotiation and mediation, in which the parties resolve their differences on their own terms, have universally come to occupy a central position in dispute resolution and are slowly but surely substituting litigation processes world ov

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Case Comment: Balancing Freedom of Religion in the Workplace,  Eweida and Others v the United Kingdom

Case Comment: Balancing Freedom of Religion in the Workplace, Eweida and Others v the United Kingdom

Name: Natalie Pratt University: University of Oxford Abstract On the 15 January 2013 the Fourth Section of the European Court of Human Rights handed down its highly anticipated judgment in Eweida and Others v The United Kingdom. The case concerned the challenge by four applicants against the United Kingdom (‘UK’) regarding the alleged infringement of their rights under Article 9 (freedom of thought, conscience and religion) and Article 14 (prohibition of discrimination) of the European Convention on Human Rights (hereafter the ‘Conventi

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Searching, Suggesting and Speaking: Does a Company Have Recourse for Defamation on Google?

Searching, Suggesting and Speaking: Does a Company Have Recourse for Defamation on Google?

Name: Donal Scott University: London School of Economics and Political Science In 2005, Google’s CEO Eric Schmidt estimated the total amount of data indexed and searchable by Google to be in the region of 170 terabytes.[1] The figure is obviously considerably higher today. The prospect of having such large volumes of information available and readily searchable online is both very exciting and somewhat worrying. From an economic perspective, the internet represents a great source of enterprise and growth. In 2009, online activities contribut

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